Tag Archives: Psionics

An Interview with T. Galen Hieronymus

by Joseph Goodavage
Analog Science Fiction
January, 1977

(Original found here: www.svpvril.com/Hier.html)

Nestled in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains of Georgia are the electronic workshops, laboratory, and home of a lively, witty octogenarian engineer, inventor, and philosopher named T. Galen Hieronymus, the Big Daddy of American psionics. More than any other pioneer in the field, Hieronymus name is as familiar to psionics as Nixon’s to politics. The inventor first came to the attention of John W. Campbell, Jr., in the early 1950s when the late editor of Analog began his investigation and subsequent experimentation with scientifically “impossible” devices — instruments so strange and bizarre that he suppressed his natural skepticism and performed experiments with psionics devices personally. Result: A series of articles in Astounding, kicked off by a typical Campbell editorial — hard-nosed, logical — followed by years of controversy, testing, experimentation, more investigation and even official scientific/military interest in the seemingly endless potentialities of quasi-electronic instruments that could (a) analyze the component elements of an ore sample without spectroscopic, chemical or other orthodox methods and, most surprising of all, (b) influence (even kill) living organisms, even from vast distances, with no scientifically understandable mechanism at the other end.

Continue reading An Interview with T. Galen Hieronymus